Archive for the 'Pet Articles' Category

Chook the Lyrebird who imitates construction sounds

08 05th, 2009 Author: SnootyPaws

I saw this on the news the other day, Chook is a Lyrebird at the Adelaide zoo.

They’ve been doing construction work around the zoo and Chook has picked up a lot of new sounds which he imitates. The zoo thinks he’s making the following sounds in this clip:

1. Hammer
2. Chainsaw
3. Jack hammer
4. Lawn mower hitting sticks
5. Leaf blower starting
6. Power drill
7. Wood saw
8. Human voices
9. Two-way radio
10.Worker whistling

In the clip he was also mimicking kookaburra and lorikeet sounds as well as other bird noises. What a fantastic bird! Check out Cook at the Adelaide Zoo for yourself.

Technorati Tags: lyrebird, adelaide zoo, construction sounds, chainsaw, hammer

The iBone dog toy from Snooty Paws is featured in the December edition of Australian Macworld magazine.

Unfortunately we’ve currently run out of this toy (it’s been hugely popular!) however click on the ‘tell me when it arrives’ button and we’ll email you as soon as we receive more stock.

macworld.jpg

Technorati Tags: Australian Macworld, ibone, dog toy, ibone toy, pet toy

Australian Jewish News features Snooty Paws

11 29th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

Our freinds at the Australian Jewish News again featured some of our Jewish themed pet products in the Summer Home liftout.

At Snooty Paws, we are continually expanding our range and we have a great range of pet products to spoil your pet this Chanukah.

ajn-nov08.jpg

Technorati Tags: Jewish, pet accessories, pet toys, dog toys, Chanukah, Hanukkah, Dreidel, bagel, chew toys, tough toys, Star of David, Kosher bone, Menorah

Pet Insurance – is it really worth it?

07 05th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

Yesterday I decided to take out pet insurance for our Burmese cat, Jackson.

A work colleague was completely shocked to find out this week that her cat had torn it’s cruciate ligament from jumping off a fence incorrectly and as a result needed an x-ray, day of observation at the vet followed by an operation which is going to cost $1 700.

If like me, you don’t have a few thousand dollars saved away for a rainy day or potential pet emergency, it’s definately worth considering pet insurance, especially since most are only around $20 a month.

Our cat is an indoor cat but I figured that even he could jump off a couch or side table incorrectly and damage a paw and I really don’t want to have the financial stress associated with a mega vet bill from an illness or injury nor do you want to have to even consider whether it’s easier just to get your pet put down!

As with everything when you’re reasearching pet insurance, read the policy details carefully. None of them that I could find insure for pre existing injuries and most have a waiting period for illness (3 weeks to a month) but many will insure your pet for accidents as soon as you take out the policy. Some pure dog breeds have special conditions applicable to them such as large dog breeds as apparently they age faster and some dangerous breeds are uninsurable. Extra’s that I found include services like refunds on the purchase price on your pet if they die, advertising money if they get lost etc. Pet insurance really gives you peace of mind – pets like children seem to be prone to accidents and insuring them is all part of being a responsible pet owner.

So is it worth getting pet insurance? Well there’s some that argue that you’re better off putting the money you’d spend on pet insurance away in a seperate high interest earning account but if like me you’re not the best at saving then perhaps it’s better to pay a small monthly amount knowing that you’re covered if anything happens. Also I figure if you put the money you’d spend on insurance ($20) in an account, it would take 5 years to save $1 200 – what if something happens much earlier? $20 a month is not going to break the bank but what are your thoughts? do any readers have pet insurance or have had any pet insurance experiences?

I found an informative article on the NineMSN Money website.

A pet insurance comparison website is Oz Pet Insurance.

Some Australian pet insurers are:

RSPCA
Petsecure
PetPlan
Vets Own
AFS PetMed
Insurance Line
PetCover
Manchester Unity

Technorati Tags: pet insurance, pet insurer, cat insurance, dog insurance, pet insurance australia, rspca pet insurance, petsecure, petplan, vets own, afs petmed, insurance line, petcover, manchester unity, pet health, pet injury, pet accidents, vet bills, vet refunds

How to Groom a Dog

06 08th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

Regular grooming will keep your pet clean, healthy and looking beautiful. It’s best to get your dog used to regular grooming so that it doesn’t become a struggle. If your pet has sensitive skin use a shampoo especially formulated for sensitive skin and don’t overwash your dog. Once a week is more than enough so that the dogs natural oils can come out otherwise their skin may become too dry.

Follow these simple rules on how to clean and groom your dog easily.

1. Gather all your materials – brushes, shampoo and conditioner, nail clippers, towels etc. It’s best to invest in quality products.

2. Give your dog a good all over brush to begin with to get rid of any knots, matting or burrs from the garden. It is much easier to brush your dog when their fur is dry than when it is wet as it can become prone to matting. Severely matted dog fur may need to be cut out by a groomer or vet – these can become painful for your dog and can sometimes lead to infections as bacteria can grow between the matted fur and their skin. If you find your dogs fur regularly becomes matted you may be best to keep their fur shorter.

3. Check your dogs eyes and remove any ‘sleep’ from their eyes with a cotton wool ball that is damp

4. Check yoru dogs ears. If there is a lot of wax, dirt or if they’re smelly the ears should be cleaned. If this is an ongoing problem always get this checked with your vet as this could be an infection. Use specially formulated ear cleaner and pour some onto a cotton wool ball or square and gently wipe away the dirt or wax. You may prefer to wear gloves. Be careful not to wipe too deep into the ears as they are very sensitive.

5. Brush your dogs teeth – many dogs have teeth and gum disease issues. You can buy toothpaste for dogs (don’t use human toothpaste as this could make your dog sick) and many vets supply a rubber bristle brush which goes onto your finger or a bristle glove. Regular brushing will help keep your dog healthy and happy and get them used to it.

6. Clip your dogs nails – you should only need to clip away a small amount. Be sure not to clip the blood vessel which can often be seen through the nail. If you’re unsure take your pet to a dog groomers or to your vet (they will only charge a small fee) and get them to show you how to do this. Nail clippers can be purchased from pet stores.

7. Now it’s time to wash your dog! If you’re washing them in the bath you may want to buy a non slip mat to put on the bottom to help your pet stay in place. Remove your pets collar (don’t put it back on your dog until it is fully dried as this will trap moisture and can cause rashes and skin irritations.) If you’re washing your dog in the shower, thoroughly wet your dog with the shower hose, begin to shampoo or scrub your dog with dog soap. Use a comb or brush to help evenly coat the shampoo through your dogs fur. Be careful not to get soap or shampoo in your dogs eyes and do not spray water into your dogs ears as this can be painful and cause infections.

8. Thoroughly rinse your dog – this is important as soap or shampoo left in may cause skin irritations.

9. Towel dry your dog – a microfiber dog towel will help absorb water quickly. Gently dry the ears. If your dog has long hair you may want to blowdry your dog but leave their fur slightly damp so as not to dry out your dogs skin too much.

If you’ve found the whole experience too difficult or hard then perhaps look at getting your dog professionally groomed once a month but the more you groom your dog -the better you’ll get at it and your dog will eventually get used to grooming.

Remember to give your dog lots of praise after being groomed and perhaps give them a yummy treat for being so well behaved.

For further tips, pictures and info visit wikiHow.

Technorati Tags: dog grooming, how to groom a dog, pet grooming, washing a dog, dog shampoo, dog soap, wash a dog

Beautiful Flower Dog Bouquet’s

05 25th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

 d-flower-bouquet-1.jpg

 dog-flower-bouquet-1.jpg

dog-flower-bouquet-2.jpg

Technorati Tags: flower bouquet, dog flower decoration, flowers, dogs

Is your dog too tubby? What about liposuction?

05 25th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

Yes now your dog too can have cosmetic surgery if they’re carring too much fat, they can also have testicular implants and even have steel capped teeth or porcelain veneers!

Welcome to the world of cosmetic surgery for dogs. An article in today’s The Age reveals that the University of Sydney’s new canine teaching hospital will enable owners to bring their pets in for cosmetic enhancements.

The cost of liposuction on your pooch will cost around $2 000 so before you outlay the expense and put your pet through pain and surgery, consider a trip to the vet to be educated on how much you should feed your pet and get out there and walk your pet to lose those excess kilo’s.

Technorati Tags: cosmetic surgery dogs, dog liposuction, testicular implants, dog plastic surger

Easter often means chocolate – and lots of it! but be careful not to feed any to your pets or you may end up spending your long weekend at the vets.

According to an article at the Herald Sun, a chemical found in chocolate, theobromine triggers the release of the euphori hormone, seratoning in humans, but in dogs it can lead to intoxication and poisoning.

Initially chocolate will upset your pets digestive system due to the high levels of fat and sugar and can cause vomiting, nausea and increased urination and diarrhoea but six to 12 hours later the chemical kicks in casing pets to urinate more and become agitated and excitable. It can even cause irregular heart beats, blood pressure changes, seizures and if left untreated, fatal. Chocolate is also harmful to other pets.

So keep all chocolate treats – chocolate eggs and boxed chocolates and chocolate chip hot cross buns well away from pets. Although the tiniest piece of chocolate won’t necessarily harm a dog – they will get a taste for it and sniff out more.

Keep an eye on your pets around children and ensure that they know not to feed the pets their treats.

Happy Easter everyone!

Technorati Tags: easter, pets, chocolate, chocolate and dogs, dogs, holidays, snooty paws

Police dogs in Germany get footwear

02 26th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

Police dogs in the western German city of Duesseldorf will no longer get their feet dirty when on patrol: The entire dog unit will soon be equipped with blue plastic fibre shoes, officials said.

“All 20 of our police dogs – German and Belgian shepherds – are currently being trained to walk in these shoes,” Andre Hartwich said. “I’m not sure they like it, but they’ll have to get used to it.”

The unusual footwear is not a fashion statement, Hartwich said, but rather a necessity due to the high rate of paw injuries on duty. In the city’s historical old town in particular – famous for both its pubs and drunken revellers – the dogs often step into broken beer bottles, he said.

The dogs will start wearing the shoes this spring – but only during operations that demand special foot protection. The shoes comes in sizes small, medium and large and were ordered in blue to match the officers uniforms, Hartwich said.

To read the full article from the Syndey Morning Herald click here

Technorati Tags: police dogs, german shepherds, germany, dog footwear

How much does it really cost to own a cat or dog.

01 19th, 2008 Author: SnootyPaws

Owning a dog or cat can be wonderful – they’re cute, cuddly and provide companionship but how much does it really cost to own a pet?

According to an article by The Age last year, the RSPCA estimates that a dog costs between $1000 and $1500 a year, on average; while the average cat costs about $1000 a year and with a lifespan of 15 years or more, total pet costs can equate between $15 000 and $22 500 or more. These costs factor in only the basic maintenance costs and don’t factor in added luxuries such as designer pet accessories, doggie day care or gourmet food and treats.

At the cheaper end, the cost of a (typically mixed breed) dog from the RSPCA starts at $130 for a fully-grown animal to $150 for a puppy. Pedigree dogs can costs hundreds to thousands of dollars.

At Snooty Paws we are advocates for animal welfare and every year thousands of animals are put down and dumped at shelters because their owners can’t afford to keep them.

So please, if you’re toying with the idea of buying a cute new puppy, can you afford the costs? Do you have the time to properly look after a pet for the next 15 years? Because if you’re not sure then don’t.

Do your research first, ring breeders or ask dog clubs or your nearest animal welfare league or RSPCA about the temprement and possible medical issues your new pet may have as some breeds are more susceptible to ailments than others.

Technorati Tags: cost of pets, dogs, cats, pet costs, dog costs, cat costs, RSPCA, Animal Welfare League

Archive for the 'Pet Articles' Category

Chook the Lyrebird who imitates construction sounds

Author: SnootyPaws, 08 05th, 2009

I saw this on the news the other day, Chook is a Lyrebird at the Adelaide zoo.

They’ve been doing construction work around the zoo and Chook has picked up a lot of new sounds which he imitates. The zoo thinks he’s making the following sounds in this clip:

1. Hammer
2. Chainsaw
3. Jack hammer
4. Lawn mower hitting sticks
5. Leaf blower starting
6. Power drill
7. Wood saw
8. Human voices
9. Two-way radio
10.Worker whistling

In the clip he was also mimicking kookaburra and lorikeet sounds as well as other bird noises. What a fantastic bird! Check out Cook at the Adelaide Zoo for yourself.

Technorati Tags: lyrebird, adelaide zoo, construction sounds, chainsaw, hammer

The iBone dog toy from Snooty Paws is featured in the December edition of Australian Macworld magazine.

Unfortunately we’ve currently run out of this toy (it’s been hugely popular!) however click on the ‘tell me when it arrives’ button and we’ll email you as soon as we receive more stock.

macworld.jpg

Technorati Tags: Australian Macworld, ibone, dog toy, ibone toy, pet toy

Australian Jewish News features Snooty Paws

Author: SnootyPaws, 11 29th, 2008

Our freinds at the Australian Jewish News again featured some of our Jewish themed pet products in the Summer Home liftout.

At Snooty Paws, we are continually expanding our range and we have a great range of pet products to spoil your pet this Chanukah.

ajn-nov08.jpg

Technorati Tags: Jewish, pet accessories, pet toys, dog toys, Chanukah, Hanukkah, Dreidel, bagel, chew toys, tough toys, Star of David, Kosher bone, Menorah

Pet Insurance – is it really worth it?

Author: SnootyPaws, 07 05th, 2008

Yesterday I decided to take out pet insurance for our Burmese cat, Jackson.

A work colleague was completely shocked to find out this week that her cat had torn it’s cruciate ligament from jumping off a fence incorrectly and as a result needed an x-ray, day of observation at the vet followed by an operation which is going to cost $1 700.

If like me, you don’t have a few thousand dollars saved away for a rainy day or potential pet emergency, it’s definately worth considering pet insurance, especially since most are only around $20 a month.

Our cat is an indoor cat but I figured that even he could jump off a couch or side table incorrectly and damage a paw and I really don’t want to have the financial stress associated with a mega vet bill from an illness or injury nor do you want to have to even consider whether it’s easier just to get your pet put down!

As with everything when you’re reasearching pet insurance, read the policy details carefully. None of them that I could find insure for pre existing injuries and most have a waiting period for illness (3 weeks to a month) but many will insure your pet for accidents as soon as you take out the policy. Some pure dog breeds have special conditions applicable to them such as large dog breeds as apparently they age faster and some dangerous breeds are uninsurable. Extra’s that I found include services like refunds on the purchase price on your pet if they die, advertising money if they get lost etc. Pet insurance really gives you peace of mind – pets like children seem to be prone to accidents and insuring them is all part of being a responsible pet owner.

So is it worth getting pet insurance? Well there’s some that argue that you’re better off putting the money you’d spend on pet insurance away in a seperate high interest earning account but if like me you’re not the best at saving then perhaps it’s better to pay a small monthly amount knowing that you’re covered if anything happens. Also I figure if you put the money you’d spend on insurance ($20) in an account, it would take 5 years to save $1 200 – what if something happens much earlier? $20 a month is not going to break the bank but what are your thoughts? do any readers have pet insurance or have had any pet insurance experiences?

I found an informative article on the NineMSN Money website.

A pet insurance comparison website is Oz Pet Insurance.

Some Australian pet insurers are:

RSPCA
Petsecure
PetPlan
Vets Own
AFS PetMed
Insurance Line
PetCover
Manchester Unity

Technorati Tags: pet insurance, pet insurer, cat insurance, dog insurance, pet insurance australia, rspca pet insurance, petsecure, petplan, vets own, afs petmed, insurance line, petcover, manchester unity, pet health, pet injury, pet accidents, vet bills, vet refunds

How to Groom a Dog

Author: SnootyPaws, 06 08th, 2008

Regular grooming will keep your pet clean, healthy and looking beautiful. It’s best to get your dog used to regular grooming so that it doesn’t become a struggle. If your pet has sensitive skin use a shampoo especially formulated for sensitive skin and don’t overwash your dog. Once a week is more than enough so that the dogs natural oils can come out otherwise their skin may become too dry.

Follow these simple rules on how to clean and groom your dog easily.

1. Gather all your materials – brushes, shampoo and conditioner, nail clippers, towels etc. It’s best to invest in quality products.

2. Give your dog a good all over brush to begin with to get rid of any knots, matting or burrs from the garden. It is much easier to brush your dog when their fur is dry than when it is wet as it can become prone to matting. Severely matted dog fur may need to be cut out by a groomer or vet – these can become painful for your dog and can sometimes lead to infections as bacteria can grow between the matted fur and their skin. If you find your dogs fur regularly becomes matted you may be best to keep their fur shorter.

3. Check your dogs eyes and remove any ‘sleep’ from their eyes with a cotton wool ball that is damp

4. Check yoru dogs ears. If there is a lot of wax, dirt or if they’re smelly the ears should be cleaned. If this is an ongoing problem always get this checked with your vet as this could be an infection. Use specially formulated ear cleaner and pour some onto a cotton wool ball or square and gently wipe away the dirt or wax. You may prefer to wear gloves. Be careful not to wipe too deep into the ears as they are very sensitive.

5. Brush your dogs teeth – many dogs have teeth and gum disease issues. You can buy toothpaste for dogs (don’t use human toothpaste as this could make your dog sick) and many vets supply a rubber bristle brush which goes onto your finger or a bristle glove. Regular brushing will help keep your dog healthy and happy and get them used to it.

6. Clip your dogs nails – you should only need to clip away a small amount. Be sure not to clip the blood vessel which can often be seen through the nail. If you’re unsure take your pet to a dog groomers or to your vet (they will only charge a small fee) and get them to show you how to do this. Nail clippers can be purchased from pet stores.

7. Now it’s time to wash your dog! If you’re washing them in the bath you may want to buy a non slip mat to put on the bottom to help your pet stay in place. Remove your pets collar (don’t put it back on your dog until it is fully dried as this will trap moisture and can cause rashes and skin irritations.) If you’re washing your dog in the shower, thoroughly wet your dog with the shower hose, begin to shampoo or scrub your dog with dog soap. Use a comb or brush to help evenly coat the shampoo through your dogs fur. Be careful not to get soap or shampoo in your dogs eyes and do not spray water into your dogs ears as this can be painful and cause infections.

8. Thoroughly rinse your dog – this is important as soap or shampoo left in may cause skin irritations.

9. Towel dry your dog – a microfiber dog towel will help absorb water quickly. Gently dry the ears. If your dog has long hair you may want to blowdry your dog but leave their fur slightly damp so as not to dry out your dogs skin too much.

If you’ve found the whole experience too difficult or hard then perhaps look at getting your dog professionally groomed once a month but the more you groom your dog -the better you’ll get at it and your dog will eventually get used to grooming.

Remember to give your dog lots of praise after being groomed and perhaps give them a yummy treat for being so well behaved.

For further tips, pictures and info visit wikiHow.

Technorati Tags: dog grooming, how to groom a dog, pet grooming, washing a dog, dog shampoo, dog soap, wash a dog

Beautiful Flower Dog Bouquet’s

Author: SnootyPaws, 05 25th, 2008

 d-flower-bouquet-1.jpg

 dog-flower-bouquet-1.jpg

dog-flower-bouquet-2.jpg

Technorati Tags: flower bouquet, dog flower decoration, flowers, dogs

Is your dog too tubby? What about liposuction?

Author: SnootyPaws, 05 25th, 2008

Yes now your dog too can have cosmetic surgery if they’re carring too much fat, they can also have testicular implants and even have steel capped teeth or porcelain veneers!

Welcome to the world of cosmetic surgery for dogs. An article in today’s The Age reveals that the University of Sydney’s new canine teaching hospital will enable owners to bring their pets in for cosmetic enhancements.

The cost of liposuction on your pooch will cost around $2 000 so before you outlay the expense and put your pet through pain and surgery, consider a trip to the vet to be educated on how much you should feed your pet and get out there and walk your pet to lose those excess kilo’s.

Technorati Tags: cosmetic surgery dogs, dog liposuction, testicular implants, dog plastic surger

Easter often means chocolate – and lots of it! but be careful not to feed any to your pets or you may end up spending your long weekend at the vets.

According to an article at the Herald Sun, a chemical found in chocolate, theobromine triggers the release of the euphori hormone, seratoning in humans, but in dogs it can lead to intoxication and poisoning.

Initially chocolate will upset your pets digestive system due to the high levels of fat and sugar and can cause vomiting, nausea and increased urination and diarrhoea but six to 12 hours later the chemical kicks in casing pets to urinate more and become agitated and excitable. It can even cause irregular heart beats, blood pressure changes, seizures and if left untreated, fatal. Chocolate is also harmful to other pets.

So keep all chocolate treats – chocolate eggs and boxed chocolates and chocolate chip hot cross buns well away from pets. Although the tiniest piece of chocolate won’t necessarily harm a dog – they will get a taste for it and sniff out more.

Keep an eye on your pets around children and ensure that they know not to feed the pets their treats.

Happy Easter everyone!

Technorati Tags: easter, pets, chocolate, chocolate and dogs, dogs, holidays, snooty paws

Police dogs in Germany get footwear

Author: SnootyPaws, 02 26th, 2008

Police dogs in the western German city of Duesseldorf will no longer get their feet dirty when on patrol: The entire dog unit will soon be equipped with blue plastic fibre shoes, officials said.

“All 20 of our police dogs – German and Belgian shepherds – are currently being trained to walk in these shoes,” Andre Hartwich said. “I’m not sure they like it, but they’ll have to get used to it.”

The unusual footwear is not a fashion statement, Hartwich said, but rather a necessity due to the high rate of paw injuries on duty. In the city’s historical old town in particular – famous for both its pubs and drunken revellers – the dogs often step into broken beer bottles, he said.

The dogs will start wearing the shoes this spring – but only during operations that demand special foot protection. The shoes comes in sizes small, medium and large and were ordered in blue to match the officers uniforms, Hartwich said.

To read the full article from the Syndey Morning Herald click here

Technorati Tags: police dogs, german shepherds, germany, dog footwear

How much does it really cost to own a cat or dog.

Author: SnootyPaws, 01 19th, 2008

Owning a dog or cat can be wonderful – they’re cute, cuddly and provide companionship but how much does it really cost to own a pet?

According to an article by The Age last year, the RSPCA estimates that a dog costs between $1000 and $1500 a year, on average; while the average cat costs about $1000 a year and with a lifespan of 15 years or more, total pet costs can equate between $15 000 and $22 500 or more. These costs factor in only the basic maintenance costs and don’t factor in added luxuries such as designer pet accessories, doggie day care or gourmet food and treats.

At the cheaper end, the cost of a (typically mixed breed) dog from the RSPCA starts at $130 for a fully-grown animal to $150 for a puppy. Pedigree dogs can costs hundreds to thousands of dollars.

At Snooty Paws we are advocates for animal welfare and every year thousands of animals are put down and dumped at shelters because their owners can’t afford to keep them.

So please, if you’re toying with the idea of buying a cute new puppy, can you afford the costs? Do you have the time to properly look after a pet for the next 15 years? Because if you’re not sure then don’t.

Do your research first, ring breeders or ask dog clubs or your nearest animal welfare league or RSPCA about the temprement and possible medical issues your new pet may have as some breeds are more susceptible to ailments than others.

Technorati Tags: cost of pets, dogs, cats, pet costs, dog costs, cat costs, RSPCA, Animal Welfare League